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Railroad  Pioneers,  1802-1840

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pioneers & events

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The early railroads began in Britain, with experimental locomotive engines in 1802 and the first public rail line in 1825,
and the less-industrial United States began catching up at around that time.


                                                               


Railroad  History  Links

world railroad history timeline at Pacific Southwest Railway Museum
Railway & Locomotive Historical Society [est. 1921]
National Railway Historical Society [est. 1935]
Pacific Railroad Society [est. 1936] in Alhambra, CA
Maps of The Past - restored historic railroad & other maps
Prof. Jensen's 'Guide To Railroad History'
'Railroad History In A Nutshell' at Railroad Heritage web portal
Beamish Open Air Museum of Northeast England


Important  Railroad  Pioneers  &  Events


Thomas Newcomen [1664-1729] invented the 'atmospherical' steam engine in 1712 to pump water out of Britain's coal and tin mines.


James Watt [1736-1819] of Glasgow, Scotland invented a much-improved low-pressure steam engine in 1763; by 1800, around 2,000 steam engines of Watt's design were in use at mines and factories and water works around the world. The elderly Watt disapproved of experiments with high-pressure steam engines; he said that Trevithick's inventions were dangerous and also filed a series of lawsuits about patent infringement by Trevithick.


Richard 'Captain Dick' Trevithick [1771-1833]
Mining engineer Richard Trevithick of Cornwall, U.K. demonstrated the first successful steam locomotive in Wales in 1804. His early experiments were with high-pressure steam engines, road-worthy steam carriages, and tramway steam locomotives. A locomotive built by Trevithick at Coalbrookdale in 1802 may or may not have been fired up and operated; drawings survive and are the basis for two replica engines. In 1803, Trevithick installed several boilers at the Pen-y-Darren Ironworks in Wales; the owner asked Trevithick to place a boiler onto wheels suitable for a local tramway; the owner made a bet for 500 guineas that the engine could haul ten tons of iron along a 9¾-mile tramroad; the engine did so on 21 February 1804 - along with 70 men in 5 wagons (at the speed of 2.5 miles per hour), thus winning the bet and making history. The tramway track could not handle the engine's weight, so it was returned to stationary boiler duty.

A full-scale replica of Trevithick's historic 1804 locomotive was constructed from the Coalbrookdale drawings for a museum in Cardiff, Wales in 1981,
and is now housed at the National Waterfront Museum at Swansea; the replica Pen-y-Darren Locomotive is fired up several times a year to run
on a 40-meter track outside the museum. { watch video [4:00] at YouTube }

Richard Trevithick entry at Wikipedia • Camborne Town Council official website
Trevithick Day [April 2015 = #32] in Camborne, Cornwall, U.K.
The Trevithick Society [est. 1935] is based in Camborne, Cornwall, U.K.
The Friends of Trevithick Society website is gone (2014)

replica of the 1802 Coalbrookdale Locomotive  click here for photograph of locomotive under steam outdoors at Blist Hills Museum in Shropshire (in a new window)   •    replica of the 1804 Pen-y-Darren Locomotive  click here for photograph of locomotive indoors at Swansea (in a new window)

Richard Trevithick 1871 biography with an Account of His Inventions by Francis Trevithick  "Life of Richard Trevithick: With An Account of His Inventions" [1871]
biography by {son} Francis Trevithick [1812-77]

Volume 1: Cambridge Univ Press 8½x5½ pb [1/2011] for $39.99
Volume 2: Cambridge Univ Press 8½x5½ pb [1/2011] for $39.99
Richard Trevithick 1934 biography by H.W. Dickinson & Arthur Titley  "Richard Trevithick: The Engineer and The Man" biography [1934]
by H.W. Dickinson & Arthur Titley

Cambridge Univ Press 9x6 pb [10/2010] for $34.99
Cambridge Univ Press hardcover [1934] out of print/scarce
Richard Trevithick, Giant of Steam biography by Anthony Burton  "Richard Trevithick: Giant of Steam" biography [2000]
by Anthony Burton

Aurum Press 7½x5 pb [6/2002] out of print/many used
Aurum Press 9½x6½ hardcover [9/2000] out of print/used
Genius Richard Trevithick's Steam Engines book by Philip M. Hosken  "Genius: Richard Trevithick's Steam Engines" [2013]
by Philip M. Hosken

92-page Footsteps Press 8½x5½ pb [4/2013] for $12.10


the 1813 Puffing Billy
The Beamish Open Air Museum of Northeast England built a replica engine in 1975, which operates on its Pockerley Waggonway
(along with replicas of the 1815 Steam Elephant and of George Stephenson's 1825 Locomotion).


The Steam Elephant locomotive was built circa 1815 for the Wallsend Colliery in Northeast England. Existence of the engine was not discovered until 1931 from an oil painting dated 1820. Research by the Beamish Museum found that the engine tended to slip on wooden rails, and was not considered a success until the introduction of iron rail; the Steam Elephant was scrapped in the late 1820s.

The Beamish Open Air Museum of Northeast England designed and built a replica engine in 2002,  click here for photograph of replica and train at Beamish Museum (in a new window) which operates
on its Pockerley Waggonway (along with replicas of the 1813 Puffing Billy and of George Stephenson's 1825 Locomotion).


Politician and inventor Col. John Stevens III [1749-1838] of New Jersey, USA was among those who obtained a charter for the New Jersey Railroad
in 1815; the line was horse-drawn until Stevens built a prototype 'steam carriage' in 1825.

The Pennsylvania Railroad built a working replica engine in 1939 for display at the New York World's Fair;  click here for photograph (in a new window)
it was donated to the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in 1979.


George Stephenson [1781-1848] of U.K.
entry at Wikipedia • Stephenson Railway Museum, Tyne & Wear, U.K.

George Stephenson was born in Northumberland, U.K in 1781 and was illiterate until the age of 18; while working as a brakesman at local mines, he paid for schooling at night and learned reading, writing and arithmetic. He worked in the mines at Killingworth and was promoted to enginewright in 1811. Various lists suggest that Stephenson built as many as 16 'travelling engines' while at Killingworth; his Blόcher engine of 1814 was the first successful flanged-wheel adhesion locomotive; his other engines were underboilered or too heavy to run on wooden rails. During 1815-16, Stephenson devised a safety lamp for coal miners that was much safer than that of Sir Humphrey Davies; controversy over whether such an un-educated man as Stevenson could have produced this invention without stealing the idea delayed recognition until 1833, when the Royal Society awarded him £1,000.

In 1817, Stephenson built the Duke steam locomotive for the Kilmarnock and Troon Railway; the chain-driven 6-wheel engine was converted
for the plate rails in use there, but was too heavy and-or lacked proper clearance; scrapped sometime after 1830.

Stephenson built the 8-mile Hetton colliery railway in 1820; he used a combination of gravity on downward inclines and locomotives
for level and upward stretches; it was the first railway using no animal power.

Stephenson built The Locomotion in 1825 for the world's first public steam rail company, the Stockton & Darlington Railway.
The Beamish Open Air Museum of Northeast England built a replica of the Locomotion engine in 1975, which operates on its Pockerley Waggonway
(along with replicas of the 1813 Puffing Billy and of the 1815 Steam Elephant).

After difficulties with surveys and with getting approval from Parliament, the Liverpool & Manchester Railway hired George Stephenson in 1828 to construct the 35-mile railway for them. Major engineering feats were designed and completed – the Sankey Viaduct, Wapping Tunnel, the rock cut at Olive Mount, the cast iron Water Street Bridge, and others. Meanwhile, there was controversy about the best choice for motive power – iron rail adhesion steam locomotives were rumored to be dangerous, cable-driven trains were not reliable, and some still insisted on horse-powered trains. So the L&MR announced a series of trials at the Rainhill section of the line (with suitable difficulties such as a 2% uphill grade); the tests took place in October 1829.

Stephenson's son Robert [1803-59] built the Rocket steam locomotive  click here for color drawing (in a new window) in 1829, which was entered in and won the Rainhill Trials.
Rocket's innovations included multiple (24) small-diameter flues thru the horizontal boiler, and directly-connected driving rods.

The 35-mile Liverpool & Manchester Railway opened on 15 September 1830 with eight locomotives and a busy timetable.

The 170th anniversary of the Rainhill Trials was marked in 1999 by a renactment on the Llangollen Railway heritage line in North Wales
using the York replica and replicas of Novelty and Sans Pareil (the other serious contenders in 1829); Rocket repeated its win.

The original Rocket locomotive is on display at the Science Museum in London, UK; in 1928, Henry Ford commissioned a replica of the Rocket locomotive
which is housed at the Ford Museums in Dearborn, Michigan; a 1970s replica Rocket locomotive is based at the Railway Museum in York
and offers short rides (back and forth on short track). { watch video [2:52] at YouTube }

An earlier replica of the Rocket locomotive & cars was used in two silent films: Buster Keaton's "Our Hospitality" silent feature [1923] {IMDb credits} -
watch free at Internet Archive [1:13:10] and Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle's "The Iron Mule" [1925] {IMDb credits} - watch free at Internet Archive [music added; 10:21];
that replica might be the Rocket that is on display indoors at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Illinois.

Life of George Stephenson, Railway Engineer biography by Samuel Smiles  "The Life of George Stephenson, Railway Engineer" [1857]
by Samuel Smiles, Jr. [1812-1904]

an abridged version was published in 1859 with the title "The Story of The Life of George Stephenson"
Kindle Edition from Leeaf Classics [1/2013] for $5.99
BiblioBazaar 8¾x5¾ pb [10/2008] for $28.99
Univ of Michigan Library 8½x5¼ pb [12/2005] for $29.99
BiblioLife 9¼x6 hardcover [10/2008] for $39.99
The Story of The Stephensons and Our Railways book by Helen Cross Knight  "Puffing Billy and the Prize Rocket: or, The Story of The Stephensons and Our Railways" [T. Nelson & Sons, London 1873]
by Mrs. Helen Cross Knight [1814-1906]

178-page Kindle Edition from Amazon Digital Services [12/2012] for FREE {sic}
101-page Kindle Edition from Amazon Digital Services [6/2012] for $1.99 {sic}
176-page Univ California Libraries (Blue Cover) 8x5 pb [8/2011] for $13.99
complete 'Rocket' book online (120+ page images) at University of Florida
Lives of The Engineers / George and Robert Stephenson book by Samuel Smiles  "Lives of The Engineers, Volume 5: George and Robert Stephenson - The Locomotive"
[1899] by Samuel Smiles, Jr. [1812-1904]

Kindle Edition from Amazon Digital Services [3/2011] for FREE {sic}
Adamant Media/Elibron Classics 8¼x5¼ pb facsimile of 1904 edition [2/2005] for $29.99
John Murray Publrs, Ltd. hardcover [1899] out of print/scarce
George & Robert Stephenson - The Railway Revolution book by Lionel Thomas Caswell Rolt  "George and Robert Stephenson: The Railway Revolution" [Longmans Green 1960]
by L.T.C. Rolt

Kindle Edition from Amberley Publng [8/2012] for $9.99
Amberley Publng 9x6 pb [5/2009] for $19.57
Penguin Books UK 7¾x5 pb [10/78] out of print/used
Greenwood Press hardcover [10/77] out of print/used
George Stephenson Remarkable Life biography by Hunter Davies  "George Stephenson: Biographical Study of The Father of The Railways" [1975]
by Hunter Davies

Weidenfeld & Nicolson 8½x5¾ hardcover [7/75] out of print/used
"George Stephenson: The Remarkable Life of The Founder of The Railway" [2004]
by Hunter Davies
— The publisher describes this as a reprinted version of the 1975 work, yet the earlier book has 368 pages and this later one has only 224 pages.
Kindle Edition from The History Press [3/2012] for $9.99
Sutton Publng, Ltd. 8x5 pb [7/2004] out of print/used
George Stephenson biography by Adrian Jarvis  
"George Stephenson" biography [2008]
by Adrian Jarvis

48-page Shire Library 8¼x6 pb [3/2008] for $15.00
The Rocket Men: George and Robert Stephenson book by Robin Jones  "The Rocket Men: George and Robert Stephenson (Illustrated)" [2013]
by Robin Jones

cover phrases '1814-2014 Steam Bicentenary' and 'The Men Who Reshaped The World'
Kindle Edition from Mortons Media Group [12/2013] for $4.99
132-page single-issue magazine [12/2013] out of print/scarce


The Novelty [1829] 'well tank' steam locomotive was a serious contender and crowd favorite at the Rainhill Trials, but dropped out due to
a burst boiler pipe; a highly-modified working replica engine was built in 2002 and is now at the Swedish Railway Museum.

The Sans Pareil [1829] steam locomotive was a serious contender at the Rainhill Trials, but dropped out due to a cracked cylinder; repaired and in use
until 1844; used as a stationary boiler to 1863; cosmetically restored in 1864; now on display at the National Railway Museum, Shildon, U.K.;
a working replica engine was built in 1980 and is now at the museum in Shildon (fired up as recently as 2005).


The 3-mile Granite Railway in Massachusetts began operations in October 1826, powered by horse-drawn railcars; the line became a branch
of the Old Colony & Newport Railway in 1871, which was absorbed into the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad in 1893
– the Granite Railway is considered the first commercial railroad in the U.S.


The Delaware & Hudson Canal Company imported the Stourbridge Lion [1828] steam locomotive from England  click here for color drawing (in a new window)
and began testing in 1829 at Honesdale, Pennsylvania.


Robert Stephenson & Company built early steam locomotive Planet in 1830 as engine #9 for the Liverpool & Manchester Railway; design improvements
over Rocket included cylinders inside the frame, a steam dome, and standardized buffers & couplings. Railfans built a working replica of Planet in 1992;
the engine is based in Manchester but often travels to other cities.  click here for photograph (in a new window)


Peter Cooper [1791-1893] built the Tom Thumb [1830] steam locomotive for the Baltimore & Ohio RR.
The Tom Thumb was for demonstration and not used in revenue service; the original was not preserved.
The semi-accurate Tom Thumb replica built in 1927 is based at the B&O Museum in Baltimore.  click here for photograph of the replica train (in a new window)


The Best Friend of Charleston [1830] steam locomotive was built in New York for the South Carolina Canal & Rail Road
Company.  click here for color drawing (in a new window) Best Friend is considered to be the first locomotive built in the United States for revenue service; it also
experienced the first locomotive boiler explosion in the U.S. The garishly-painted replica was built in 1928 and is based in Charleston.  click here for color postcard (in a new window)


The Camden & Amboy Railroad of New Jersey imported the John Bull [1831] steam locomotive from England.  click here for 1893 photograph (in a new window)   click here for magazine illustration (side view) (in a new window)
The B&O Museum houses the original John Bull, which was last fired up in 1981.


The Mohawk & Hudson Railroad of New York began operation in 1831 using the locally-built DeWitt Clinton locomotive  click here for magazine illustration (in a new window)
which was the first American long-boiler (not vertical) locomotive.

The New York Central RR built a replica DeWitt Clinton locomotive and train in 1893 for the Chicago World Fair. It also appeared at the 1927 Fair of The Iron Horse in Maryland, then was used for promotional purposes by New York Central, and in 1935 was loaned to the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan;
the replica also appeared at the 1939-1940 New York World's Fair and at the Chicago Railroad Fair in 1948-1949.  click here for recent photograph of the replica 'DeWitt Clinton' at the Dearborn museum (in a new window)


After foundry owner Phineas Davis [1792-1835] won a B&O design competition in 1830, he built the prototype 0-4-0 steam locomotive "Atlantic"; the design was so successful that B&O built twenty more locomotives of this type, the last vertical-boiler steam locomotives built in America. The beams at the top of the engine earned the nickname 'Grasshopper' for the class; the "Atlantic" prototype was scrapped after Davis's death in 1835.

In 1892, B&O rebuilt the 1836 0-4-0 #7 "Andrew Jackson" to resemble "Atlantic" for exhibit at the 1893 Columbian Exhibition; the replica also saw operation at
the 1939 New York World's Fair and the 1948/1949 Chicago Rail Fair Pageant; the machine is currently on static display at the B&O Museum.  click here for color photo of replica 'Atlantic' steam locomotive (in a new window)


Matthias William Baldwin [1795-1866] of Philadelphia, PA
Matthias Baldwin entry at Wikipedia • Baldwin Locomotive Works entry at Wikipedia
Business at silversmiths like independent Mathias Baldwin in Philadelphia began falling off in the 1820s, so he opened a machine shop with partner David Mason to make products for the printing and bindery industry, which had previously been imported from Europe. Business grew rapidly and they needed larger quarters and more power, so Baldwin devised an improved stationary steam engine that produced 5 horsepower and remained in use for five decades (the original engine is on display at the Smithsonian). In 1831, Baldwin constructed a miniature steam locomotive based on reports from the Rainhill Trials in England; the engine was fired with coal and could haul four people, and brought much publicity. The newly-chartered Phila-delphia, Germantown & Norristown Railroad commissioned a locomotive from Baldwin and he delivered the 2-2-0 steam locomotive Old Ironsides in November 1832. The company's name was changed to Baldwin Locomotive Works; it survived the (economic) Panic of 1837, and by the 1850s was having trouble keeping up with demand (1837 production was 40 engines, 1840 production was 9 engines, 1857 production was 66 engines). B.L.W. built more than 70,000 railroad locomotives before closing in 1972 due to competition from diesel-electric motive power.

The original Old Ironsides saw service until destruction by a landslide in Vermont in 1857; a replica engine built by Baldwin for the Chicago World's Fair of 1893 is on indoor display at the Shelburne Museum in Vermont; a full-size model of this engine is said to be at the Field Columbian Museum in Chicago, Illinois {not verified}.

b&w drawing of 1832 Baldwin Old Ironsides locomotive  click here for b&w drawing of Baldwin 1832 'Old Ironsides' steam locomotive (in a new window)
color drawing of Baldwin 1832 Old Ironsides locomotive with tender and coach   click here for color drawing of Baldwin 1832 'Old Ironsides' locomotive with tender and coach (in a new window)


The Mohawk & Hudson RR ordered another locomotive in 1832; first named Experiment, later changed to Brother Jonathan.  click here for 1987 U.S.P.S. 22’ 'Brother Jonathan' postage stamp (in a new window)


The Norris Locomotive Works [1832-1866] of Philadelphia built locomotives Black Hawk and George Washington {famous for a record incline test
in July 1836} for the Philadelphia & Columbia Railroad, and the 1837 Lafayette 4-2-0 locomotive for the B&O Railroad.
The B&O Museum houses an operational 1927 replica of the Lafayette.  click here for photograph (in a new window)


The first railway service in Europe opened in May 1835 on a network of rails built by the Belgian government, using three locomotives – the 2-4-0 locomotive
Elephant built by Tayleur & Company, and 2-2-2 locomotives Stephenson and Arrow built by Robert Stephenson & Company in England.


Baldwin Locomotive Works built the Alert 4-2-0 steam locomotive in 1837 for the Utica & Schenectady Railroad in New York; it was used for two years on the Michigan Central
RR, which added a cab and tender. The Galena & Chicago Union Railroad (oldest predecessor of the Chicago & North Western Railway) purchased the locomotive, which was
shipped by schooner to Chicago and renamed Pioneer before pulling the first train outbound from Chicago on 25 October 1848. The Pioneer was loaned to the
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad for a time and then preserved.

Pioneer was steamed up for use in the railroad history pageant at the Chicago Railroad Fair [1948-49]  click here for photograph of 'Pioneer' and tender and coach in 1948 (in a new window),
and is currently on indoor display at the Chicago History Museum; the tender is in storage.


Eastwick and Harrison of Philadelphia built the 4-4-0 freight locomotive Gowan & Marx in 1839 for the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad; the engine
introduced the equalizing lever, a spring suspension system that remained in use until the last steam locomotive.  click here for photo of 1987 U.S.P.S. 22’ postage stamp (in a new window)


Locomotive  Gallery

1802 Coalbrookdale steam locomotive + replica engine  click here for photograph of replica 1802 'Coalbrookdale' steam locomotive under steam outdoors at Blist Hills Museum in Shropshire (in a new window)

1804 Pen-y-Darren steam locomotive + 1981 replica engine  click here for photograph of replica 1804 'Pen-y-Darren' steam locomotive indoors at Swansea (in a new window)

1813 Puffing Billy steam locomotive + 1975 replica engine

1815 Steam Elephant steam locomotive + 2002 replica engine  click here for photograph of replica 1815 'Steam Elephant' locomotive and train at Beamish Museum (in a new window)

1825 'steam carriage' prototype built by John Stevens [1749-1838] of New Jersey, USA + 1939 replica engine  click here for photograph of the working replica engine at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania (in a new window)

1825 The Locomotion steam locomotive + 1975 replica engine

1828 Stourbridge Lion steam locomotive  click here for color drawing of the 1828 'Stourbridge Lion' steam locomotive (in a new window)

1829 Rocket steam locomotive  click here for color drawing of Stephenson's 'Rocket' steam locomotive (in a new window)
+ early 1920s replica engine on display indoors at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Illinois
+ 1928 Henry Ford replica engine now in Michigan + 1970s replica engine based in York, U.K.

Liverpool & Manchester Railway 1830 Planet #9 steam locomotive + 1992 replica engine  click here for photograph of 1830 L&MR steam locomotive #9 'Planet' (in a new window)

Baltimore & Ohio RR 1830 Tom Thumb steam locomotive + 1927 replica engine  click here for photograph of the replica 'Tom Thumb' steam locomotive & train (in a new window)

South Carolina Canal & Rail Road Company 1830 Best Friend of Charleston steam locomotive  click here for color drawing of 1830 'Best Friend of Charleston' steam locomotive (in a new window)
+ 1928 replica engine  click here for color postcard of the replica 'Best Friend of Charleston' steam locomotive & train (in a new window)

Camden & Amboy Railroad of New Jersey 1831 John Bull steam locomotive  click here for 1893 photograph of 'John Bull' steam locomotive (in a new window)  click here for magazine illustration (side view) (in a new window)

Mohawk & Hudson Railroad of New York 1831 DeWitt Clinton steam locomotive  click here for magazine illustration of the 1831 'DeWitt Clinton' steam locomotive (in a new window)
+ 1893 New York Central RR replica engine & train  click here for recent photograph of the 1893 replica 'DeWitt Clinton' locomotive and train at the Dearborn museum (in a new window)

1832 Baldwin Old Ironsides steam locomotive  click here for b&w drawing of Baldwin 1832 'Old Ironsides' 
steam locomotive (in a new window)   click here for color drawing of Baldwin 1832 'Old Ironsides' locomotive with tender and coach (in a new window)

Mohawk & Hudson RR 1832 Experiment steam locomotive, name later changed to Brother Jonathan  click here for 1987 U.S.P.S. 22’ 'Brother Jonathan' steam locomotive postage stamp (in a new window)

Belgium National Railways 1835 Elephant 2-4-0 steam locomotive
Belgium National Railways 1835 Stephenson 2-2-2 steam locomotive
Belgium National Railways 1835 Arrow 2-2-2 steam locomotive

Philadelphia & Columbia Railroad 1836 Black Hawk steam locomotive
Philadelphia & Columbia Railroad 1836 George Washington steam locomotive

B&O Railroad 1837 Lafayette 4-2-0 steam locomotive + operational 1927 replica engine  click here for photograph of 1927 replica of the 1837 B&O RR steam locomotive 'Lafayette' (in a new window)

Philadelphia & Reading Railroad 1839 Gowan & Marx 4-4-0 freight locomotive  click here for photo of 1987 U.S.P.S. 22’ postage stamp of the 1839 'Gowan & Marx' steam locomotive (in a new window)


Books  &  Videos

A History of British Railways to the Year 1830 book by C.F. Dendy Marshall  "A History of British Railways Down To The End of The Year 1830" [1933]
by Chapman Frederick Dendy Marshall [1872-1945]

Oxford Univ Press hardcover [8/71] out of print/used
Oxford Univ Press hardcover [1938] out of print/scarce
Oxford Univ Press hardcover [1933] out of print/scarce
History of Railway Locomotives to 1831 book by C.F. Dendy Marshall  "A History of Railway Locomotives Down To The End of The Year 1831"
[Locomotive Publng 1943] by Chapman Frederick Dendy Marshall [1872-1945]

Kindle Edition from Vero Verlag GmbH [5/2013] for $4.70
Vero Verlag GmbH 8¾x6 pb [4/2014] for $19.90
Oxford Companion to British Railway History book edited by Jack Simmons & Gordon Biddle  
"The Oxford Companion To British Railway History: From 1603 To The 1990s"
[1998] Edited by Jack Simmons & Gordon Biddle

Oxford Univ Press 9½x7½ pb [6/99] out of print/used
Oxford Univ Press 9¾x7¾ hardcover [1/98] out of print/used
Encyclopedia of North American Railroads reference work edited by William D. Middleton, George M. Smerk & Roberta L. Diehl  "Encyclopedia of North American Railroads" [2007]
Edited by William D. Middleton, George M. Smerk & Roberta L. Diehl

Indispensible reference work with over 500 alphabetical entries, extensive appendices, and a list of 130 'vital railroad books'
Indiana Univ Press 11x8½ hardcover [4/2007] for $61.05
America Adopts the Railroad 1825-1862 book by Craig Miner  "A Most Magnificent Machine: America Adopts The Railroad, 1825-1862" [2010]
by Craig Miner

Described as 'the first social history of the early railroads'
Univ Press of Kansas 9x6 hardcover [10/2010] for $30.20
North American Railroads Illustrated Encyclopedia book by Brian Solomon   "North American Railroads: The Illustrated Encyclopedia" [2012]
by Brian Solomon

Kindle Edition from Voyageur Press [10/2014] for $13.80
Voyageur Press 11x9¼ pb [10/2014] for $18.66
Voyageur Press 11¼x9½ hardcover [6/2012] for $25.69

color title for 'Trains Wheels A-Rolling' color documentary film of 1948  
souvenir 1949 Official Guide Book of the 'Wheels A-Rolling' Pageant - cover price 15 cents  
"Trains - Wheels A-Rolling: 100 Years of American Railroad Progress" [1948 film]
Promotiional theatrical film for the Chicago Railroad Fair of 1948 and 1949; includes the Pageant that was performed each day, featuring Henry Ford's 1829 "Rocket" replica; 1831 "John Bull" (1927 B&O replica); 1830 "Best Friend of Charleston" replica; "DeWitt Clinton"
(N.Y.C.R.R. 1893 replica); 1837 4-2-0 "Lafayette" (B&O 1927 replica); 1830 "Tom Thumb" (1927 B&O replica); 1832 "Atlantic" (1892 replica); original 1832 4-2-0 "Pioneer" & tender & coach; original 1856 B&O 4-4-0 locomotive #25 "William Mason" (Lincoln funeral train); Rock Island construction train; U.P.R.R. 4-4-0 #119 (modified 1892 CB&Q #35); Central Pacific 4-4-0 "Jupiter" (modified 1873 Virginia & Truckee RR 'Genoa'); AT&SF loco and two yellow coaches; 1892 Burlington 4-6-0 loco #637; Porter 0-4-0T Northern Pacific Railway #1 "Minnetonka"; 1861 St. Paul & Pacific RR 4-4-0 loco #1 "William Crooks" & combine & coach; horse-drawn Chicago City Railway Archer Avenue streetcar #10; self-powered cable car; Empire State Express locomotive #999 & green coach; several early motor-cars & firetruck; 1905 Chicago & Eastern Illinois 4-4-2 loco #222 & maroon coach; 1934 CB&Q streamline "Pioneer Zephyr" diesel railcar; C&EI diesel locomotive set #1403; Burlington diesel locomotive set #129 — along with any number of horses and buggies and wagons and stagecoaches
• Produced by Lenox R. Lohr & D.M. MacMaster; written by Edward Hungerford; directed by Helen Tieken Geraghty; narrated by Gilbert Reade & Judith Jeffrey, with Aristedes Copulos as Abraham Lincoln {at 15:00}
not listed at IMDb • watch movie [33:46] online at YouTube

Steam Pioneers episode of Britain's Greatest Machines With Chris Barrie TV series  "Britain's Greatest Machines With Chris Barrie: Trains - The Steam Pioneers"
[National Geographic Channel Feb 2010]

Featured locomotives (mostly replicas) include 1802 Coalbrookdale Locomotive, 1803 London Steam Carriage, 1804 Pen-y-Darren Locomotive, 1825 Locomotion, 1829 Rocket, and 1830 Planet • Directed by Tom Adams; hosted by Chris Barrie
Region 1 DVD not available • credits at IMDb
watch full episode [47:28] online at YouTube

here on the Railroad Pioneers, 1802-1840 Page at Spirit of America Bookstore

top of page • history links • pioneers & events • locomotive gallery • books & videos

                                          

Spirit of America Bookstore's American Railroads Pages

on page one:  top of page • links • museums • Class I railroads • Class II railroads • shortline railroads

on page two:  top of page • games • RR history • narrow-gauge RRs • historic RR lines

on page three:  top of page • transcontinental railroads • railroad moguls • railroad recordings

Spirit of America Bookstore's 'Railroads in Fiction' Pages
Spirit of America Bookstore's Railroads in Fiction - Books For Young Railfans Page

Spirit of America Bookstore's 'Non-Fiction Books About Railroads' Pages

Spirit of America Bookstore's Railroad Film Festival Pages

America's Shortline Railroads Page

Spirit of America Bookstore's Scale Model & Toy Trains Page


G.E. Nordell's Colorado Travel / Railroads Links Pages
G.E. Nordell's Nevada Travel / Railroads Links Page
G.E. Nordell's New Mexico Travel / Railroads Links Page
G.E. Nordell's Utah Travel / Railroads Links Page

Travel U.S.A. / Railroad Museums Page

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